GSP vs Labrador Retriever: Here’s The Deal


Trying to decide between a German Shorthaired Pointer and a Labrador Retriever as your next pet and field companion? 

Well,These are two breeds I know a lot about. I have lived with both, hunted with both and been through the ups and downs with both so i think i can help you decide. 

Obviously, I have Hank, my GSP, but a very good friend of mine has a Black Lab that I’ve spent a lot of time around.

Hank has spent a lot of time around my friend’s Lab too, so I can literally do a side-by-side comparison of the two of them for this post, which comes in handy.

I just want to point out right out of the gates that this isn’t me telling you which breed is better. 

Instead, I’m just sharing what I know about them from my own experiences, because you might be looking at one or both breeds as a potential addition to your household and I want to give you all the information I can. So, let’s look a little closer at them both!

Temperament

I’ve covered Hank’s temperament before, so I won’t go into too much detail here. But suffice to say, he’s an active, excitable boy with a very active, excitable temperament. 

From my experience, Hank is a pretty normal GSP too, so if you’re looking for a super calm, chilled out dog to have around the house, GSPs won’t be a great fit for you.

When I look at my friend’s Lab though, they’re very different from GSPs. Hank will run around like a dog possessed whenever he sees my friend, but my friend’s Lab is much calmer when I enter a room. 

Don’t get me wrong, they still get excited, but just not Hank’s level of excitement. Instead, their temperament is probably best described as being much more even-tempered. 

They’re very trusting and kind dogs, who happily befriend other dogs and people with ease, but they do so in a much more relaxed way than GSPs do.

Personality

In terms of their personality, the two are sort of similar, with the key differences really coming from their different outlooks on life. 

Both breeds are very friendly and trusting, and both are intelligent breeds. Where I see the most difference is in how they apply that intelligence. Hank is really smart, and incredibly curious. 

That means I have to keep him busy at all times if I want to keep him out of trouble. 

My friend’s Lab, on the other hand, shows their intelligence in a much calmer way again – rather than constantly needing stimulation, they are able to show off their intelligence by following commands and being in control of themselves. 

Again, these differences are mostly to do with how active a GSP is, and how much calmer a Lab is.

But both dogs will get along brilliantly with other dogs and strangers, and they aren’t really associated with aggression at all. 

Of course, there’s always the saying that there’s no such thing as a bad dog, just a bad owner – so a large part of their personalities will always be formed by the way they have been raised by their owner. 

That being said, if you treat both breeds right and care for them properly, their personalities will always be kind and fun-loving.

Family-Friendliness

In terms of how compatible these dogs are with family life, I can say with confidence that GSPs make for excellent family pets. 

I’ve seen Hank interact with everyone from babies to elderly people, and he always seems to know exactly how to act around them. 

His excitable nature is loved by all, and I’ve always thought he somehow knows how to control himself better whenever a younger or older person is around – dogs just seem to have a sixth sense for this sort of thing.

But just like I’ve seen Hank around families, I’ve seen my friend’s Lab too, and they perform just as well. I think with Labs they are excellent family pets because of their slightly calmer nature. 

Don’t get me wrong, they can match your children’s energy levels and play around all day, but their patience and kind personalities make them a calming presence to be around too. They also love being petted. 

My friend’s Black Lab would quite happily sit around and let you stroke and pet him all day, and this is an excellent quality to have when children are involved because they will always want to be doing something with their dog.

In terms of both breeds compatibility with family life, they’re both excellent and there’s no reason they shouldn’t fit into your family perfectly, no matter what yours looks like!

Hunting Ability

I think there’s a tendency to overlook a Labrador Retrievers heritage more than a GSPs, because Labs are so often associated with being kind family dogs nowadays, but they too were originally bred for hunting purposes, exactly as GSPs were. 

Thankfully, I’ve had a lot of experience around my friend’s Black Lab whilst hunting, and they and Hank will often join me on hunting trips, so I can really see the stark differences between the breeds – and there are quite a few differences to talk about.

Let’s take pheasant hunting, for example. Picture the scene. It’s me, Hank, my friend, and his Black Lab walking through fields looking for pheasants to hunt. 

Me, my friend, and their Black Lab are all walking near to one another on the lookout for pheasants, as calm as you like. Meanwhile, Hank is running around the fields like a lunatic – desperately searching for a pheasant to point at. 

Now, you might think his excitable nature was a hindrance, but honestly, if it weren’t for Hank, we might never have found any pheasants that day. 

He was so eager to please and be the one to find the pheasants for us that his help was invaluable.

Now the Lab was helpful enough – always happy to retrieve the pheasant once we’d shot it, but not particularly interested in being the one to go and find them.

Then we went duck hunting, and the results couldn’t be more different. The Black Lab was so patient, watching the ducks like a hawk, but not moving an inch until the duck was shot and ready to be retrieved. 

Hank… Well, Hank was being Hank. His excitement overtook all of his senses, and rather than sitting patiently like the Lab, he would run around and startle the ducks before we had a chance to shoot.

 He’d happily retrieve them once we’d shot them, but I think part of his problem was his eagerness to please in this case. 

He so wanted to be the one to bring the duck back to us that he simply forgot to let us shoot one first before he went charging in.

As you can see from my experiences above, if you only need a dog to retrieve rather than get involved in the hunt, a Lab is a perfect choice.

Their patience and even-temper are ideal for this. If you want a more active hunting dog to help locate, startle, and retrieve your kills, then GSPs are better, so it really comes down to what you need them for.

Take-Home Message

I think the last point above sums up this whole post well. It all depends on your needs and what you’re looking for from your dog.

Both breeds are excellent choices, and Hank and his Black Lab friend are both perfect examples of the breeds. Honestly, I think whichever one you chose would be perfect, because they’re both just such friendly, well-rounded breeds!

meastt09

An Owner and a huge fan of GSP's! I have owned my GSP for 7 years now and learned so many things along the way to share with you all about German Shorthaired Pointers!

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